Public Input

A website of the Florida House of Representatives' Redistricting Committee and www.floridaredistricting.org

HPUBC0046 – Weinbaum, Michael

View in Google Maps

Summary:

  • Congressional Redistricting Plan
  • 27 Districts
  • Complete: 263 unassigned census blocks
  • Contiguous: The districts contain holes and noncontiguous geography
  • Direct Impacts: Statewide
  • Submitted to the Florida House of Representatives
  • Submitted by Michael Weinbaum of Hillsborough County

Open Plan in MyDistrictBuilder or Another Application:

Statistics:

Maps:

Filed under: Congress - Complete Plans, , ,

8 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. Legislative staff note that the plan author providing the following comments:

    “What I was trying to do here is maximize the number of districts that are roughly rectangular and minimize the occurrence of amoeba-shaped districts (current US House district 11), C-shaped districts (current 12) snake-shaped districts (current 3). I want to highlight a couple of things to you: 1. District 10 and district 27- since both Pinellas County and the Florida Keys are basically surrounded by water on three sides, I started these two districts by simply starting at the southern tip and went north until I had enough people. This is the most logical way to do it. 2. The old District 3 which is about 65% Black is gone. In its place are a district that is 25% black, and another that is 31% black. Considering the dynamics of primary voting, each of these districts has perhaps a 50% chance of electing a black person. This gives the Black community in North Florida the chance to perhaps have two Black representatives, if these representatives could be as palatable to the non-black population as President Obama and Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown have already proved to be. Before of course, they only had a chance for one. There are about 3 or 4 more districts like this in the rest of my plan, all less than 50% black but all with a better-than-even chance to elect a Black representative. Currently Florida has 3 ‘minority access’ districts and one majority non-black district which elected a Black person. This plan unquestionably improves minority access. 3) District 15 is one I am proud of. Osceola county plus Brevard county south of the Beachline and the Port Canaveral inlet. I am also happy with how district 16 avoided splitting Volusia or Flagler county, and how District 17 is all of Seminole county plus the 417 corridor in Orange County.”

  2. David Lewin says:

    Thank you for taking the time and effort to produce this map. I still believe that the best representation for Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade counties is Sean Phillippi’s plan.

  3. Why should we trust the Legislature to do this?

    Last November, 63% of Florida’s voters approved an amendment to the state constitution that forbids lawmakers from drawing electoral districts to favor their party or to protect incumbents.

    48.9% voted for Rick Scott as Governor. He then went on to withdraw the State’s request for pre-clearance of this amendment under the Voting Rights Act (as described in http://articles.latimes.com/2011/feb/09/nation/la-na-florida-voting-20110210)

    If you are happy to ignore the results of an election I don’t see the point in publishing proposals and collecting feedback. You’ll just ignore the feedback if you don’t like it.

  4. David Lewin says:

    Peter Goldthorp asks ‘why should we trust the legislature to do this?” FL constitution Amendments 5 & 6 didn’t provide for an independant redistricting authority, so the legislature has to draw boundaries according to ‘Fair Districts’, as defined in the amendments. Incumbents and political parties don’t want to loose seats or power, so they sue to stop ‘Fair Districts’, that they don’t like. Currently, I believe incumbent Sen. Athenia Joyner and Sen. Miguel Diaz de la Portilla are suing the state at taxpayers’ expense, to overturn amendments 5 & 6. The state is obligated to defend the law suit, which FL Attorney General Pam Bondi is doing, also at FL taxpayers’ expense. Sen. Joyner’s is one of the most agregious examples of gerrymandering in the state. Ultimately, I expect the final district boundaries will be drawn by the FL state supreme court. Of all the FL US Congressional districts maps submitted, Sean Phillippi’s is the best representation for Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade counties, and I can see no reason why it should not be adopted.

  5. For some reason, I can see David’s response to my comment but I don’t see my original comment in the thread. Here’s what I said:

    “Why should we trust the legislature to do this?

    In November, 63% of Florida’s voters approved an amendment to the state constitution that forbids lawmakers from drawing electoral districts to favor their party or to protect incumbents.

    48.9% voted for Rick Scott as Governor. He then withdraw the State’s request for pre-clearance of this amendment under the Voting Rights Act (as described in http://articles.latimes.com/2011/feb/09/nation/la-na-florida-voting-20110210)?

    If they are happy to ignore the results of an election what’s the point in submitting proposals for comments. They will just ignore any comments they don’t like.”

    • Peter, sorry it looks like our spam filter ask us to moderate your first post for some reason, maybe the link included it in – anyway, pulled it out of our spam folder and it’s back above.

    • Peter, regarding your questions – you have essentially answered your own question. Amendments 5 and 6 prohibit drawing districts that intend to favor or disfavor incumbents or political parties. Members of the public have thus far submitted many appropriate and usable ways to redistrict the many communities that make up Florida. Often times, those members of the public are stating how their suggestions align with the different state and federal legal requirements for redistricting. In particular, they are stating what they meant when they voted for Amendments 5 and 6. In turn, the Legislature will be using these maps and suggestions to develop proposals for the State House, State Senate and Congressional maps. The idea here is for the Legislature to draw as few of these districts as possible, letting the public guide the way. In that way, the Legislature’s role becomes assuring compliance with any federal or state legal issues that have been overlooked.
      Regarding your point about preclearance, the Florida House and Senate jointly submitted the application for preclearance for Amendments 5 and 6 back in the spring of 2011, and they were subsequently precleared by the U.S. Department of Justice.

www.floridaredistricting.org

Plan Explorer

The Plan Explorer blog site highlights partial and complete redistricting plans submitted by Florida residents to the Florida House of Representatives. The site also includes suggestions submitted in writing. The tools to the left offer several ways to search the submitted plans.

Most Frequently Visited Redistricting Plan Submissions

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 26 other followers

Thanks for Stopping By!

  • 40,791 visitors!
%d bloggers like this: